Hearing in Tongues

(sermon 5/31/20 – Pentecost Sunday)

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Image by Holger Schué from Pixabay

Numbers 11:24-30

So Moses went out and told the people the words of the Lord; and he gathered seventy elders of the people, and placed them all around the tent. Then the Lord came down in the cloud and spoke to him, and took some of the spirit that was on him and put it on the seventy elders; and when the spirit rested upon them, they prophesied. But they did not do so again. Two men remained in the camp, one named Eldad, and the other named Medad, and the spirit rested on them; they were among those registered, but they had not gone out to the tent, and so they prophesied in the camp. And a young man ran and told Moses, “Eldad and Medad are prophesying in the camp.” And Joshua son of Nun, the assistant of Moses, one of his chosen men, said, “My lord Moses, stop them!” But Moses said to him, “Are you jealous for my sake? Would that all the Lord’s people were prophets, and that the Lord would put his spirit on them!” And Moses and the elders of Israel returned to the camp.

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Acts 2:1-21

When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place. And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting. Divided tongues, as of fire, appeared among them, and a tongue rested on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other languages, as the Spirit gave them ability.

Now there were devout Jews from every nation under heaven living in Jerusalem. And at this sound the crowd gathered and was bewildered, because each one heard them speaking in the native language of each. Amazed and astonished, they asked, “Are not all these who are speaking Galileans? And how is it that we hear, each of us, in our own native language? Parthians, Medes, Elamites, and residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya belonging to Cyrene, and visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, Cretans and Arabs—in our own languages we hear them speaking about God’s deeds of power.” All were amazed and perplexed, saying to one another, “What does this mean?” But others sneered and said, “They are filled with new wine.”

But Peter, standing with the eleven, raised his voice and addressed them, “Men of Judea and all who live in Jerusalem, let this be known to you, and listen to what I say. Indeed, these are not drunk, as you suppose, for it is only nine o’clock in the morning. No, this is what was spoken through the prophet Joel: ‘In the last days it will be, God declares, that I will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh, and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams. Even upon my slaves, both men and women, in those days I will pour out my Spirit; and they shall prophesy. And I will show portents in the heaven above and signs on the earth below, blood, and fire, and smoky mist. The sun shall be turned to darkness and the moon to blood, before the coming of the Lord’s great and glorious day. Then everyone who calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved.’

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It’s often helpful when hearing a passage of scripture to place ourselves within the story that’s unfolding – and not just doing that once, experiencing the story from just one vantage point, but to move around within it – imagining the story and thinking about the different ways that different people in the story would experience it from their vantage point. What were they seeing in that moment; what were they hearing; what were they even smelling? What were they feeling/ how did they understand what was playing out in front of them?

When we hear this familiar passage from Acts – the story of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit descending on Jesus’ disciples and their going out into the street proclaiming the gospel, speaking its words of prophetic truth in all the languages of the people of the city and all the religious pilgrims who had come there from countless different places – I suspect that most of the time, we hear the story, and imagine it, through the eyes of the disciples. I suspect it’s normal for us to first see ourselves in this story as the ones doing the speaking.

But what if we changed that? What if we changed places? What if we experienced this story from the vantage point of the people who were out in the street, and who were hearing the message from the disciples? There they were, hearing this message from people they didn’t know, people different from them, and even though they were speaking a familiar language, the message they were offering was a discomforting one. One that they didn’t necessarily want to hear. One said they needed to repent and turn away from their current ways.

It isn’t always easy to hear challenging, prophetic words like the ones spoken by the disciples that day; in fact, it usually isn’t. And it’s even harder when those prophetic voices are coming from people who are different from us, and who are conveying their message in a way that we wouldn’t normally expect. We saw that in today’s first reading, from the Book of Numbers, when Moses’ hand-picked 70 elders, the select leadership of the Israelites, had gathered, and the Holy Spirit descended upon them as it had on MOses himself, and as it did on Jesus’ disciples, and the seventy all started to prophesy. But then, two others began to prophesy, too – Eldad and Medad, two men who weren’t part of the leadership, the inner circle – they were just part of the common folk, out in the midst of the people, began to prophesy, and some in the leaders didn’t like it and wanted them to stop. But Moses said no – that the Holy Spirit will move wherever it will, and will speak through whomever it will, and when they speak, they should be listened to.

Today, on this Pentecost Sunday in the year 2020, I have to think that we’re in the midst of a similar moment. A moment where important, prophetic words are being spoken by people who are different from most of us, and they’re conveying their message in ways different from what we might typically prefer. They’re speaking words of truth that can sometimes be discomforting, and that can stretch us into places that might sometimes be hard to accept.

A big part of the Pentecost story is the part about the disciples speaking in tongues. But this Pentecost, I think that we white people should be less concerned with speaking in tongues, and more concerned with hearing in tongues. Truly prophetic words are coming to us in the past weeks from members of the black community, who are feeling pain. Hurt. Grief, frustration, anger, and yes, rage, and all of it is absolutely justified. We all have hearts; most of us feel those same emotions over the recent tragic news stories about the deaths of Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor, and George Floyd and others. But in a sense, we can’t really feel those emotions in the same depth, in the same way that they can, not fully anyway, because not only are they feeling those base emotions, they’re experiencing them through the lens, the filter, of the more than 400 years of abuse and injustice that they’ve endured on this continent at the hands of white people and white power structures – a 400-year history of injustice that Mayor Fisher very properly referred to in his press conference yesterday morning.

The blunt prophetic words coming from black mouths now and landing harshly on white ears are telling us that our governmental and social systems are broken. They have utterly failed people of color. They’re structured in a way that creates privilege for whites and injustices for people of color, and that makes true racial equity impossible. Right now, people are going out into the streets here in Louisville, and Minneapolis, and Atlanta, and countless other cities, speaking words every bit as prophetic and true as the ones spoken by Jesus’ disciples when they went out into the streets of Jerusalem on that day of Pentecost. These prophetic voices of our black brothers and sisters, like the voices of Eldad and Medad, and like the voices of Jesus’ disciples, can’t be ignored. We dare not ignore them. They are demanding – and through them, the Holy Spirit is demanding – that these things have to change. Racism is sin, and the structures in our society that perpetuate racial injustice is just as much sin. As a matter of our faith – as a matter of our hearing and responding to the moving of the Holy Spirit through all of those demanding change now – we have to stand in solidarity with them, and walk alongside them, and work together with them, to dismantle racism and racist structures in our society.

And as we hear those voices, we can’t allow acts of vandalism and property damage, which is virtually inevitable in times of frustration and rage, to distract us from our commitment to anti-racism. As bad as vandalism is, there is no equivalency in it; there is no negating the more life-threatening injustice going on. I heard one store owner whose windows were broken downtown being interviewed. He was saddened by the damage to his store, but still, in a show of support for the protestors and their cause, he said, “my window can be replaced; Breonna Taylor can’t.” To be blunt, if we allow ourselves to get more upset, more enraged, more drawn to action by vandalism than we get over the unjust killing of human beings, we need to be asking ourselves some very serious questions.

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. famously said that violence is not the answer, that rioting is not the answer, but that still, a riot is “the language of the unheard” – meaning that while violence and vandalism is wrong in the abstract, when pushed beyond a certain threshold, a certain intolerable point of injustice and powerlessness, it is an all but inevitable and understandable reaction from anyone, whoever they are. So the real solution to the problem of people rioting, of engaging in the “language of the unheard,” is to actually *hear* them, and to actually do something about the injustices and powerlessness they face. This time, in the name of Jesus, and literally, for the love of God, let’s really hear them, and working together, and with God’s help, let’s fix this ungodly, unjust, and evil situation.

Amen.

Can You Only Imagine?

(sermon 6/9/19 – Pentecost Sunday)

 

Acts 2:1-21

When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place. And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting. Divided tongues, as of fire, appeared among them, and a tongue rested on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other languages, as the Spirit gave them ability.

Now there were devout Jews from every nation under heaven living in Jerusalem. And at this sound the crowd gathered and was bewildered, because each one heard them speaking in the native language of each. Amazed and astonished, they asked, “Are not all these who are speaking Galileans? And how is it that we hear, each of us, in our own native language? Parthians, Medes, Elamites, and residents of Mesopotamia, Judea and Cappadocia, Pontus and Asia, Phrygia and Pamphylia, Egypt and the parts of Libya belonging to Cyrene, and visitors from Rome, both Jews and proselytes, Cretans and Arabs—in our own languages we hear them speaking about God’s deeds of power.” All were amazed and perplexed, saying to one another, “What does this mean?” But others sneered and said, “They are filled with new wine.”

But Peter, standing with the eleven, raised his voice and addressed them, “Men of Judea and all who live in Jerusalem, let this be known to you, and listen to what I say. Indeed, these are not drunk, as you suppose, for it is only nine o’clock in the morning. No, this is what was spoken through the prophet Joel: ‘In the last days it will be, God declares, that I will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh, and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams. Even upon my slaves, both men and women, in those days I will pour out my Spirit; and they shall prophesy. And I will show portents in the heaven above and signs on the earth below, blood, and fire, and smoky mist. The sun shall be turned to darkness and the moon to blood, before the coming of the Lord’s great and glorious day. Then everyone who calls on the name of the Lord shall be saved.’

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This morning, we remember an event that changed the world forever. Today, Pentecost Sunday, we remember the day that Jesus’ first followers made a radical shift in their mindset, going from people still often hiding behind locked doors, and when not doing that, at very least trying to not draw attention to themselves – not even the resurrection, and seeing the risen Jesus had changed that – to now being people who were literally out in the street, speaking all these languages, and proclaiming the same message that Jesus had proclaimed, the same message that had gotten him killed.

So what was it that caused such a dramatic, and dangerous, change in direction? Well, since we’ve all heard this story so many times, we know the easy answer is the presence of the Holy Spirit. And that’s true, but I think there’s more to it than that. I think that before the arrival of the Holy Spirit, the disciples first had to have time to come to terms with what all had happened, and what it all really meant. Over the better part of two months, they gradually came to understand the significance of Jesus having been killed by the powers that be. Long before anyone ever considered the idea that Jesus had to die in order to pay some debt that we owed for our sins that God demanded and we couldn’t pay ourselves – long before any medieval theologians wrote about that, even long before the apostle Paul  talked about Jesus’ death in those terms – what these first believers focused on wasn’t the idea that Jesus’ death was necessary for some cosmic business transaction with God, but rather, that Jesus’ death was the direct result of what he’d said, and taught, and done during his life. Those in positions of power, and the people who benefited from that power, saw Jesus’ message as a direct challenge to their places of power and comfort – and they were right.

So when the Spirit did come, these disciples had had the time to process all of this, and then, having been emboldened by the Spirit, they went out into the streets telling the people gathered there that Jesus’ resurrection was God’s validation of what he had proclaimed and done – that even though his opponents had tried to silence him, his message was too big and too true for even death to keep him. As he spoke to that crowd, in this part that we read today and as it continues beyond where we stopped, Peter framed the significance of Jesus’ death precisely in the context of his life – and how his message had been one of God’s love and favor for all people, especially those who were being treated unjustly by those in places of power and privilege – the poor, the sick, the imprisoned, the oppressed, the forgotten or ignored – a message that was completely at odds with what Peter called “this corrupt generation,” and it was that, he told them, that they needed to repent for and be saved from.

So to summarize, in the time from the resurrection to Pentecost, Peter and the other disciples had had sufficient time to consider and start to understand the meaning of it all, and then the Spirit gave them the ability and the desire and the courage to catch God’s vision and run with it.

Two thousand years later, with every new person and every new generation, we’re continually re-learning and re-catching the vision that God has for us, and we’re running with it, too. And yes, honestly, sometimes we get it wrong, and sometimes it takes us a long time – sometimes a very long time – to back up and get it right. But the fact remains that God is speaking into all of our hearts, giving us time to discern and understand, and giving us the Spirit to dwell within us just as was the case with those first disciples, enabling us to catch God’s vision for us, and in our own time and place, and run with it, too.

I’ve been thinking a lot about that lately within the context of our own congregation – how this congregation has grown and changed from its origins, when the congregation was mostly made up of potato farmers who primarily decided to build their own church here just so they wouldn’t have to use the toll road to get to church on Sunday mornings. We’re so much different from that now. In fact, we’re different now than we were even just 20 years ago. We’re more involved in mission initiatives than we were in the past, we’re involved in social justice work, our involvement with immigrants and refugees has expanded. We’re building houses with Habitat, we’re working for creation care and decreasing our own congregational carbon footprint, and yes, you called a pastor who even ten years ago, you would never have even considered. Later this week, members of our congregation will go downtown and be part of a protest march led by the Stated Clerk of the Presbyterian Church, to protest the unjust cash bail system and call for its elimination, and just a couple days later, members of Springdale, for the third year in a row, will show that we’re a welcoming and affirming church by taking part in the Gay Pride parade. Can you imagine that?

The truth is, we’re doing so many things that I don’t have time to mention this morning, and each of them are ways that we offer witness to, and work to advance, that gospel proclaimed by Jesus that was too big and too true for death to silence it. In all likelihood, in the next few weeks we’ll sign on as part of the denomination’s “Matthew 25” initiative, which asks congregations to focus over the coming year on at least one way of working in the world to either “1.) build congregational vitality; 2.) dismantle structural racism; or 3.) eradicate systemic poverty.” And then, at the end of the year, to submit a brief report about our experiences. If anything, our biggest challenge here will be deciding which one of the many things we do to report about.

There’s no question that our congregation has caught God’s vision. Can you only imagine where that vision will take us in even just the next five years?

And beyond the idea of our congregation catching the vision – can you only imagine where God will lead you, personally, in that same timeframe? Pentecost is a great time to think about that – to carve out some time in your busy schedule to think about what Jesus’ life, his message, his teachings, really means in your own life. How does that change how you’d be living otherwise?

And most importantly – where do you see God’s Spirit leading you? What is God’s vision for you now? Where, and what, is God drawing you toward, and realize that in all likelihood, that be a very different direction from where it was just a handful of years ago.

Can you only imagine – what amazing, and yes, sometimes scary, but always wonderful things, does God have in store for you, and you, and you, and me, tomorrow? Next month? Next year? Whatever it is, and wherever it leads, you can rest assured that God will always be walking that journey with us, leading us, comforting us, challenging us, inspiring us, and emboldening us, and all of that coming out of the unimaginable, unending love that God has for us. And that’s good news, whatever language you hear it in.

Gracias a Dios.

Pentecost (sermon May 24, 2015)

Pentecost - Lubbenau

When the day of Pentecost had come, they were all together in one place. And suddenly from heaven there came a sound like the rush of a violent wind, and it filled the entire house where they were sitting. Divided tongues, as of fire, appeared among them, and a tongue rested on each of them. All of them were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other languages, as the Spirit gave them ability.

Now there were devout Jews from every nation under heaven living in Jerusalem. And at this sound the crowd gathered and was bewildered, because each one heard them speaking in the native language of each. Amazed and astonished, they asked, “Are not all these who are speaking Galileans? And how is it that we hear, each of us, in our own native language?… In our own languages we hear them speaking about God’s deeds of power.” All were amazed and perplexed, saying to one another, “What does this mean?” But others sneered and said, “They are filled with new wine.”

But Peter, standing with the eleven, raised his voice and addressed them, “Men of Judea and all who live in Jerusalem, let this be known to you, and listen to what I say. Indeed, these are not drunk, as you suppose, for it is only nine o’clock in the morning. No, this is what was spoken through the prophet Joel: ‘In the last days it will be, God declares, that I will pour out my Spirit upon all flesh, and your sons and your daughters shall prophesy, and your young men shall see visions, and your old men shall dream dreams. Even upon my slaves, both men and women, in those days I will pour out my Spirit; and they shall prophesy.  – Acts 2:1-8, 11b-18

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Well, last Sunday we had little green cards, and this Sunday we have big red… well, big red everything, because it’s Pentecost Sunday. We know what Pentecost is all about for us Christians; what’s going on in that passage from Acts that I told to the kids; right? The story takes place after Jesus has ascended, and now his followers are gathered in Jerusalem to observe the Jewish festival of Pentecost, that was always fifty days after Passover. It was both a thanksgiving for the grain harvest, as well as a celebration of the covenant that God made with Moses at Mount Sinai. And while they’re gathered together, they’ve finished their morning devotions, maybe they’re sitting around having some breakfast, scanning the paper, checking Facebook while they have a cup of coffee, this amazing thing happens. This incredible, indescribable thing that Luke and his sources can only describe as something like a roaring wind. Today, any time the roaring wind of a tornado rolls through somewhere and tears everything to bits, the news crews show up in the aftermath and it seems like every time, there’s always somebody who tells them “It sounded just like a freight train!” But since they didn’t have freight trains in first-century Jerusalem, Luke was stuck for a simile and just had to settle for “it was like the rush of a violent wind,” and let it go at that.

And then, according to the story, things get really weird.

Something like tongues of fire hover over all their heads, and they ran out of the house and into the street and started speaking in different languages that the religious pilgrims visiting from many different countries were able to understand as they stood there watching the scene unfold.

Thinking about this story, it’s pretty easy to see why Pentecost is sometimes called the “birthday of the church.” A bunch of people were sitting around minding their own business, when all of a sudden God lights a fire under them – well, technically, over them – to get them out of the house and out into the street, and to start sharing God’s good news with others in a way that they can understand it, and all the while them not really understanding exactly how it was all happening. I mean, think about it – other than a potluck and a committee meeting or two, that’s a pretty good description of what the church is all about, or at least what it should be all about.

The Holy Spirit, the very Spirit of God, comes to dwell within them and empowers them, energizes them in ways they’d never imagined possible. And this story continues within us, too. That same Spirit is active in our lives, and in the current church, too. Most of the time, when we think about the Holy Spirit, we tend to think about the Spirit as being a Comforter for us, and that’s certainly true. But this story is about another aspect of the work of the Holy Spirit. It’s the “get off your hands, get out of your comfort zone, and follow me into something new” aspect of the Holy Spirit that we get in this story. That always-stirring-the-pot work of the Spirit that’s always been behind the changes and advances of the church throughout its history. I think it’s safe to say that when a church congregation dies, more often than not it was because it wanted to stick with familiarity more than it was willing to hear and accept where God’s Spirit was calling them into new things. It wasn’t because people weren’t interested in God, faith spirituality Studies show over and over again that people’s desire for spirituality, and longing for an authentic connection with God and a community of faith, really has remained constant even if they aren’t interested in the same, traditional way the church is offering it. That’s exactly what the latest Pew Research poll shows – that the percentage of the U.S. population identifying as Christian has dropped by eight percent in the past seven years, while their longing for that kind of spiritual connection has actually stayed about the same.

I believe that, as many people have suggested, we’re in the midst of a period of church history that only comes around every 500 years or so, a period where the Holy Spirit is calling us, the church, to rethink almost everything in order to reconnect with people – to share the good news of God’s love and to be a real, well-rounded, connected community of faith in new ways that make sense to people today – people whose way of understanding God, humanity, and the universe is as different from the way we understood them in the 1960s as the way we understood them in the 60s was different from the days when Luke wrote the Book of Acts. Is it possible that that the findings of this latest Pew study are a sign that the Holy Spirit is telling us to get out of our house, and learn a new language, as it were, just as those disciples did? Is it possible that, if all this red fabric is supposed to symbolize fire, the most appropriate place to put it would be on our pew cushions?

I think one of the ways that the Holy Spirit can be seen teaching the church new languages today is in the PCUSA’s “1001 New Worshiping Communities” initiative, which has started more than 250 non-traditional worshiping communities in just the past couple of years – more worshiping communities, I might add, than the total number of congregations that have left the denomination in the same timeframe. These new communities are exhibiting ways of being church that many of us might hardly even recognize as “church,” but they’re proclaiming the gospel in new ways – in new languages – and they’re being heard by more and more people, and they’re growing.

As just one example of their reimagining what church could be like, a number of them meet weekly, but their gatherings would only look anything like what we’d think of as a standard Sunday worship service maybe once a month. The rest of the times, they’ll get together – sometimes, all together, other times in smaller subgroups – and they’ll have a short devotional and prayer, and then they’ll participate in some mission work – volunteering at a food pantry, or a homeless shelter, or visiting people in nursing homes, even people they don’t even know. Or they’ll have a common meal, or a picnic, or a bowling trip or a softball game; whatever. These communities have learned two things: first, that while people crave this kind of spiritual connection and sense of authentic community, contemporary schedules are just ridiculously tight, and not out of not caring about spiritual matters, but out of financial and family necessity. Whether anyone likes it or not, most people don’t have the amount of time available each week to devote to a community of faith in the traditional ways that its activities have been programmed and scheduled. It isn’t that people don’t want to participate; the way things exist, they just can’t. Second, these new worshiping communities have realized that done properly, all of these kinds of gatherings are actually valid and meaningful forms of worship just as much as a traditional Sunday service – and in some cases, maybe more so. They’ve realized that there is really no division or distinction between worship, mission, fellowship. It’s all worship; it’s all mission; it’s all fellowship.

That’s just one new language the Holy Spirit is teaching the church. It’s obviously a very different one from the one we’ve traditionally been speaking. But whatever the specifics, I promise you that in this time of major transition in the history of the church, God is trying to push us out into the street and to teach us a new language too, just like those disciples in Jerusalem. Yes, that can be scary. But they were scared, too, and the Spirit still guided them and empowered them and equipped them for the task God was calling them to. And God has promised to do the exact same for us.

So this week, I guess I invite you to think and pray about what new language God might be calling you to learn. Think about that on a congregational level, yes, but also on a personal level, too. Is God trying to lead you into some new way of living out and sharing your faith with others? If so, what might it be? If you can discern what it is, grab onto it and don’t let go. Learning that new language, and being willing to follow God where the Spirit is leading you, drawing you, will be an amazing thing – even if all the while, it will be something scary, and loud, and earth-shaking and unsettling, and you don’t really know where it’s going – just like a freight train.

Thanks be to God.