It Doesn’t Have to Be This Way

(sermon 21/8/19 – Second Sunday of Advent)

Advent-Wreath-2-candles-lit

Isaiah 11:1-10

A shoot shall come out from the stump of Jesse, and a branch shall grow out of his roots. The spirit of the Lord shall rest on him, the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and the fear of the Lord. His delight shall be in the fear of the Lord. He shall not judge by what his eyes see, or decide by what his ears hear; but with righteousness he shall judge the poor, and decide with equity for the meek of the earth; he shall strike the earth with the rod of his mouth, and with the breath of his lips he shall kill the wicked. Righteousness shall be the belt around his waist, and faithfulness the belt around his loins. The wolf shall live with the lamb, the leopard shall lie down with the kid, the calf and the lion and the fatling together, and a little child shall lead them. The cow and the bear shall graze, their young shall lie down together; and the lion shall eat straw like the ox. The nursing child shall play over the hole of the asp, and the weaned child shall put its hand on the adder’s den. They will not hurt or destroy on all my holy mountain; for the earth will be full of the knowledge of the Lord as the waters cover the sea.

On that day the root of Jesse shall stand as a signal to the peoples; the nations shall inquire of him, and his dwelling shall be glorious.

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Matthew 3:1-12

In those days John the Baptist appeared in the wilderness of Judea, proclaiming, “Repent, for the kingdom of heaven has come near.” This is the one of whom the prophet Isaiah spoke when he said, “The voice of one crying out in the wilderness: ‘Prepare the way of the Lord, make his paths straight.’” Now John wore clothing of camel’s hair with a leather belt around his waist, and his food was locusts and wild honey. Then the people of Jerusalem and all Judea were going out to him, and all the region along the Jordan, and they were baptized by him in the river Jordan, confessing their sins.

But when he saw many Pharisees and Sadducees coming for baptism, he said to them, “You brood of vipers! Who warned you to flee from the wrath to come? Bear fruit worthy of repentance. Do not presume to say to yourselves, ‘We have Abraham as our ancestor’; for I tell you, God is able from these stones to raise up children to Abraham. Even now the ax is lying at the root of the trees; every tree therefore that does not bear good fruit is cut down and thrown into the fire. “I baptize you with water for repentance, but one who is more powerful than I is coming after me; I am not worthy to carry his sandals. He will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire. His winnowing fork is in his hand, and he will clear his threshing floor and will gather his wheat into the granary; but the chaff he will burn with unquenchable fire.”

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This always seemed like an odd week in Advent to me. We start off with this beautiful passage from Isaiah that we heard earlier, where he speaks so eloquently about this wonderful future time of peace, when the wolf will lie down with the lamb, and so on – and then we hear this second reading, about wild, cranky, angry John the Baptist, insulting the people standing around listening to him, calling them a “brood of vipers.” I mean, I get the idea of John’s call to repentance fitting in with the focus of Advent, but his whole attitude seems more than a bit off-putting, especially this week when our Advent litany recognizes the peace embodied in the coming of Christ. It’s like that crazed panhandler that you’re trying to avoid eye contact with while you’re stopped at the traffic signal, who’s yelling at you through the window because you won’t give them any money.

But the more I consider it, I guess I understand it. John knows this passage from Isaiah; he’s read it and heard it many times, and he knows its hopeful vision of a peaceful existence for all the world; and he knows that he’s telling people about this very same vision, this same time, except he’s telling them that it’s about to break into the world. But he looks around, and almost everything he sees is the exact opposite of that vision, and quite simply, he’s ticked. He’s angry at what he sees going on around him, and he’s calling people out for it. What he sees is an existence where sin hasn’t just tainted everything, it’s completely taken over.

At this point, I suppose it would be important to recognize just what it is that John considers that sin to be. Just what is it that a Jew in first-century Palestine would consider sin? The biblical scholar Amy-Jill Levine has pointed out that we Christians have often been misinformed, mis-taught, that the Jewish religion of Jesus’ time was all about ritual and ritualistic practices; a kind of checklist religion, over against a Christian religion that is supposedly so much different from that, when in fact Judaism then wasn’t any more ritual-based than Christianity is. She goes on to explain that the Jewish concept of sin, then, wasn’t that some set of ritualistic traditions hadn’t been adhered to – but rather, throughout the Hebrew scriptures, whenever sin is discussed, whenever it’s identified, almost without exception it refers to attitudes and especially actions that have the effect of mistreating or hurting other people. Did you hear that? Almost every single description of sin details actions that hurt other people. Actions that treat others without justice, or mercy; actions that exploit or cheat others from enjoying the same existence that a person wants for themselves. It’s a virtual constant in the Hebrew scriptures, and we see the exact same message in Jesus’ words in the gospels.

So John looks around him and sees a society that is completely under the thumb of the Roman occupation. Oh, sure, Rome has given the Jews some degree of autonomy in their local governance and their religion, but not much – they’re on a pretty tight reign. The people are paying heavy taxes to a faraway empire and have very limited freedoms. People are being treated unjustly and abusively. And any time they get even a little bit out of line, the violent power of Rome comes crushing down on them, making sure they understand who’s really in charge. And adding insult to injury, some of their own people are collaborating with Rome to impose the dictates of this occupying force, simply because they realize that if they go along with the Roman occupiers, things will go well for them, and they don’t want to upset their own relative comfort and well-being.

John sees all this – how the people, especially the poor, are being mistreated and exploited. How God’s commands for caring for the widow and orphan, the sick and poor, are being ignored. And he gets mad. He recognizes that this just isn’t the way things should be, especially now, as God has told him that this eternal peaceful kingdom is about to break into the world. Prepare the way for the coming of the Lord. You brood of vipers, you poisonous snakes, change your ways, now, before it’s too late.

And now, as we think about this future time of peace ourselves, we look around us and we see the same thing. We see a society, a culture, that in so many ways seems to have gone off the rails. Poor people – men, women, and children; young and old – who can’t find work and who don’t have enough money to eat are being kicked off of federal food assistance. People legally entering the country seeking refugee status are illegally jailed, and families are separated, often without any plan for reunification, in violation of federal law, international treaties, Christian moral teaching, and just plain common sense and decency. People of color are enduring generations of injustice, being mauled in a criminal justice system designed to destroy individuals and families in multiple ways, and to deprive them of the right to vote, and to essentially create a perfectly legal replacement to Jim Crow society and a return to near-slave era conditions. One particular religious group imposing its narrow, burdensome, discriminatory beliefs on the entire society. Innocent men, women, and children becoming victims of human sacrifice to the false god of gun proliferation. A consumer culture that brainwashes us from before we’re even out of the cradle that we should want everything that we don’t have, and more of everything we already do; and that our worth as human beings isn’t that we’re loved by God and that we’ve been created in God’s image, but instead, our worth is measured by the worth of our stuff. Government leaders who rule with impunity, with no sense of accountability or ethics, only out for their own personal gain at the expense of all of us. Thousands of people being bankrupted every year by outrageous healthcare costs charged by for-profit healthcare corporations, or even dying simply for lack of health insurance or affordable life-saving prescriptions. The resurgence of the Ku Klux Klan and other white supremacist, with nationalist groups, the rise of neo-Nazism and neo-Fascism all despite our thoughts that it could never happen here. But it’s happening here.

If you can see all of those things and not be every bit as mad as John the Baptist, you’re just not paying attention. Just John saw what he saw, we can see and know that this isn’t the way things should be. That it doesn’t have to be this way. That we need to repent from these kinds of things in our own personal lives, to be sure, but also that there are systems at work in our society that are causing and enabling these problems in ways far worse than we could ever cause them on our own. We’re all inescapably enmeshed in these harmful, these sinful, systems. Thinking about all of those things makes John the Baptist’s calling people out as a brood of vipers sounds almost tame.

As a congregation, we’ve signed on to the Matthew 25 vision. Next month, I’ll host a three-week Bible study that focuses on Matthew’s gospel, and Matthew 25 in particular, and just what the whole Matthew 25 emphasis really means to us as a congregation, here, where the rubber meets the road. But as a bit of a preview, I can say that it has a lot to do with exactly that kind of turning away from the current ways, and turning toward God’s ways, that John was calling for in this passage. The Matthew 25 vision echoes the idea that all those things don’t have to be that way, and it calls us to taking concrete steps to try to change them.

John was so upset, so angry, because he could see that same vision that Isaiah saw and told about. It was wonderful, and beautiful, and peaceful. And while we can’t create that final, ultimate peaceful world that only Christ will finally usher in some day, having that vision in our minds is enough for us to see that the current world could be so much better, so much more just, so much more peaceful, than it is now – and that by turning our lives, and especially our social systems and structures, toward God’s paths, toward God’s standards of compassion, and mercy, and justice, we’ll be adding just that much more straw into the manger in preparation for our celebration of Jesus’ birth, and in hope of his eventual return and establishing that wonderful world that Isaiah and John  saw. So have righteous anger at what you see – but don’t stay in the anger. Let that anger become repentance, and let that repentance become action, and in that action, find hope. Hold on to that hope, because those words from Isaiah, and from John, are true; that peace, that shalom, is coming.

Thanks be to God.

 

Then They Will See (sermon 11/15/15)

son of man

As he came out of the temple, one of his disciples said to him, “Look, Teacher, what large stones and what large buildings!” Then Jesus asked him, “Do you see these great buildings? Not one stone will be left here upon another; all will be thrown down.”

When he was sitting on the Mount of Olives opposite the temple, Peter, James, John, and Andrew asked him privately, “Tell us, when will this be, and what will be the sign that all these things are about to be accomplished?” Then Jesus began to say to them, “Beware that no one leads you astray. Many will come in my name and say, ‘I am he!’ and they will lead many astray. When you hear of wars and rumors of wars, do not be alarmed; this must take place, but the end is still to come. For nation will rise against nation, and kingdom against kingdom; there will be earthquakes in various places; there will be famines. This is but the beginning of the birthpangs.

“As for yourselves, beware; for they will hand you over to councils; and you will be beaten in synagogues; and you will stand before governors and kings because of me, as a testimony to them. And the good news must first be proclaimed to all nations. When they bring you to trial and hand you over, do not worry beforehand about what you are to say; but say whatever is given you at that time, for it is not you who speak, but the Holy Spirit. Brother will betray brother to death, and a father his child, and children will rise against parents and have them put to death; and you will be hated by all because of my name. But the one who endures to the end will be saved.

“But when you see the desolating sacrilege set up where it ought not to be (let the reader understand), then those in Judea must flee to the mountains; the one on the housetop must not go down or enter the house to take anything away; the one in the field must not turn back to get a coat. Woe to those who are pregnant and to those who are nursing infants in those days! Pray that it may not be in winter. For in those days there will be suffering, such as has not been from the beginning of the creation that God created until now, no, and never will be. And if the Lord had not cut short those days, no one would be saved; but for the sake of the elect, whom he chose, he has cut short those days. And if anyone says to you at that time, ‘Look! Here is the Messiah!’ or ‘Look! There he is!’ —do not believe it. False messiahs and false prophets will appear and produce signs and omens, to lead astray, if possible, the elect. But be alert; I have already told you everything.

“But in those days, after that suffering,
the sun will be darkened,
and the moon will not give its light,
and the stars will be falling from heaven,
and the powers in the heavens will be shaken.

Then they will see ‘the Son of Man coming in clouds’ with great power and glory. Then he will send out the angels, and gather his elect from the four winds, from the ends of the earth to the ends of heaven.

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Since I didn’t really grow up in the church, the first time I ever encountered these words of Jesus was when I was in my teens, when I’d become part of a “parachurch” Christian youth group. In between weekly gatherings where we did almost all of the strange activities that Rachel Held Evans described in her book that the Book Group just discussed, and a few that she didn’t; and the periodic field trip to some amusement park or the beach, we’d have weekly Bible studies. These studies usually centered around how the scripture of the day spoke to the most pressing issues in our lives at the moment – how the physics test I’d blown was going to affect my GPA and the college I’d get into, or how our parents just didn’t understand us and must hate us, or how we really liked some unnamed other person but they didn’t even know we existed. Looking back on it, I never realized how many Bible passages must speak directly to that particular issue, based on how many times that became the topic of conversation

But beyond those general discussions, when the merely occasional group attendees weren’t around and it was just those of us who were apparently in the inner circle, and we wanted to be Really Serious about Bible study, we’d start to talk about passages like this one. The passages people said dealt with the “end times.” The end of the age. The Rapture. We’d read these passages, and cross reference them against Hal Lindsey’s hot new book “The Late, Great Planet Earth.” We’d count the years from the establishment of the nation of Israel and debate just how many years there were in a “generation,” since one of them wouldn’t pass from the beginning of a Jewish state to Jesus’ return. We’d scan the news for any sort of thing that would point, at least in our minds, to the rise of the Antichrist, the Mark of the Beast – credit cards and bar codes were particularly suspicious things, I remember – and we’d talk about the imminent arrival of years of persecution, plague, pestilence, and famine. Ah, those were good times.

In fact, a lot of people have pointed to Jesus’ words here as a description of the end of the age – the end of this broken world and the ushering in of God’s direct rule over a renewed and transformed world. If you want to impress, or more likely annoy, your friends with a bit of trivia, in serious religious discussion we call Jesus’ second coming the “eschaton.” There you go; use the word at parties at your own risk.

On the other hand, a lot of scholars and historians have pointed out that most of what Jesus described here actually did occur, just less than 40 years after the end of his earthly ministry – when the Roman occupation brutally crushed a Jewish rebellion by slaughtering thousands of people and completely obliterating the Jewish Temple forever, in 70 CE. During that slaughter, the Jesus-followers in Jerusalem remembered these particular words of Jesus – that when they saw these things occurring, to flee the city – to head into the hills and hide for their safety. That’s exactly what these Christians did, and it made them despised by their Jewish families and friends, who considered them cowards and traitors because they didn’t stand up and try to defend the city against the Romans. If there were one specific moment you could point to when Jews and Christians became two totally different groups, instead of Christians being a subset of Judaism, this was it.

So what is it, then? Was Jesus predicting something that was going to happen in the first century, or sometime in the distant future? Or both? Or did someone just put these words into his mouth, to try to make sense out of the destruction of Jerusalem and where they were supposed to go from there?

For myself, I’ve long ago put aside the way of understanding Jesus’ words here the way I heard them as a teenager. It’s been a long time since I tried to figure out whether Jesus was going to return next Tuesday at 2:30 or sometime in the next millennium. And the older I get, and the more I think about these things, I’m not sure we can really even say with any certitude what it means when Jesus talks about returning. Is his return an actual, physical thing? Personally I think so, but I can’t say that with any real certitude, and to be honest, it isn’t a dealbreaker to my overall faith. Is his return something physical, or something just spiritual? I don’t think we can know for sure.

And maybe that’s important, because I think it speaks to what I take home from Jesus’ words here. Because whatever Jesus-in-the-world might mean in the future, it means something now. We’re called to be Christ in the world, now, in our moment. We believe that we’re united spiritually with Christ, with the very Spirit of God, and that in that union, we’re called to be the face, the heart, the hands, the feet of Christ in the world right now. Christ, present, never-really-having-left in the world, every single day. Maybe when Jesus talked about all of these calamities that we’re supposed to watch for – and honestly, when has there ever been a time that we didn’t see all of them? – and then saying, “they will see the Son of man coming in the clouds,” and God sending out angels in response – maybe what he was foreseeing, predicting, at least in part, wasn’t so much about him, but about us. Maybe that’s what “they” would see – us, stepping into those situations, bringing the power of Christ’s love and peace and healing into them. Maybe *we* are the Son of Man moving in, in the wake of all those things. Those wars and rumors of wars. And earthquakes. And famines. And persecution, and hatred, and suicide bombings and mass shootings and bloodbaths perpetrated in the name of God. Maybe this is Christ telling us to do whatever we can do to reach out and be agents of healing in those times. It’s the message of the Kingdom of God. It’s the message of “This Little Light of Mine” – to be millions of individual lights, believing and working together, letting our combined light shine into all the darkest places of our world, and of human hearts. That’s the mission of the Church; that’s what we’re here for. That’s what Christ established the Church for. To concentrate our faith, and our efforts, on that – and to let the future take care of itself.

Thanks be to God.