The Untitled Sermon

(sermon 10/8/17)

many candles

Habakkuk 1:1-4, 2:1-4

O Lord, how long shall I cry for help, and you will not listen? Or cry to you “Violence!” and you will not save? Why do you make me see wrong-doing and look at trouble? Destruction and violence are before me; strife and contention arise. So the law becomes slack and justice never prevails. The wicked surround the righteous— therefore judgment comes forth perverted.

I will stand at my watchpost, and station myself on the rampart; I will keep watch to see what he will say to me, and what he will answer concerning my complaint. Then the Lord answered me and said: “Write the vision; make it plain on tablets, so that a runner may read it. For there is still a vision for the appointed time; it speaks of the end, and does not lie. If it seems to tarry, wait for it; it will surely come, it will not delay. Look at the proud! Their spirit is not right in them, but the righteous live by their faith.”

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Matthew 26:47-52

While Jesus was still speaking, Judas, one of the twelve, arrived; with him was a large crowd with swords and clubs, from the chief priests and the elders of the people. Now the betrayer had given them a sign, saying, “The one I will kiss is the man; arrest him.” At once he came up to Jesus and said, “Greetings, Rabbi!” and kissed him. Jesus said to him, “Friend, do what you are here to do.” Then they came and laid hands on Jesus and arrested him. Suddenly, one of those with Jesus put his hand on his sword, drew it, and struck the slave of the high priest, cutting off his ear. Then Jesus said to him, “Put your sword back into its place; for all who take the sword will perish by the sword.”

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Sometimes, when you get your Sunday bulletin, you’ll see there isn’t any sermon title listed. That usually means that I just hadn’t come up with what I thought would be a good title by the time the bulletin printing deadline arrived. Today, though, the reason there isn’t a title is that sadly, I’ve preached so many variations of today’s sermon that I’ve just run out of different good titles to use.

It’s been about a week now since the mass shooting in Las Vegas. Since then, we’ve seen what’s now become the all-too-familiar pattern kick into gear like we’re all just following a script. First the shock as we hear the first news reports. Then comes the immediate question, was it Islamic Terrorism – as if the deaths caused by the much more deadly Angry White Man Terrorism is somehow more socially acceptable. Then comes the searching for the terrorist’s motives, and the armchair psychoanalyzing, and filling too many hours of news programming with too little actual information with interviews of the killers’ family and friends and neighbors and third grade teacher, who all say it was a shock, he was such a nice, quiet man who wouldn’t hurt a flea. And then come the demands for more gun control regulation, and then comes the obligatory press release from the NRA, pre-written, ready to go with just the location and death count a fill-in-the-blank. Then come the politicians, who trot out in front of the cameras to say that this is not the time to “politicize” the tragedy, and to piously offer their “thoughts and prayers,” whatever that means to a politician, to the families of the dead and maimed, while wads of gun-lobby money is practically falling out of their overstuffed pockets and onto the floor. And then, after maybe a week and a half, no more than two weeks, filled with live remote reporting and candlelight vigils, the reporters and cameras move on, distracted by the next shiny object in the news cycle, and things generally go back to what we consider normal, and nothing’s changed. Rewind the tape; have it cued up and ready to go in another few months.

So much of this happens because a lot of people have allowed themselves to be sucked into a ridiculous, absolutist reading of the Second Amendment right to own firearms that won’t allow for reasonable limitations. But we know that none of our Constitutional rights is absolute. We know that we have the right to free speech, but we can’t yell “Fire!” in a crowded theater. We know that we have the right to peaceably assemble, but that the police can still tell us we can assemble on one side of the street but not the other. We know that we have freedom of religion, but we still can’t use our personal religious beliefs to deny other people their own Constitutional rights and equal protection under the law.

We’re so far past the time that we need tighter controls on possession of firearms in this country that I feel stupid even saying it. The rest of the world looks at us, and rightly so, as if we’re crazy, being willing to allow this kind of insane gun worship to continue, being willing to allow the death toll to keep rising and rising, being willing to live in a society where it’s harder to buy three boxes of Sudafed than three semiautomatic rifles. We constantly hear “Guns don’t kill people; *people* kill people!” without someone saying “Right! *People* kill people, so we need to keep guns out of the hands of *those* people!” Instead of that, in the upside-down world we live in today, we pass laws that actually make it easier – not harder, but *easier* – for the mentally disabled to buy guns.

We’re all good Americans; we all value and honor and respect our Constitutional rights. We’re good citizens of the United States. But as Christians, we’re citizens of the Kingdom of God first. We’re a people whose scriptures, whose sacred texts, are full of calls for peace, and injunctions against violence, as in the two texts we heard this morning, and there are countless others. The truth is that there is simply no scriptural justification whatsoever for our gun-saturated mentality, and we wonder what a Christian response should be to it all. Yes, we mourn when these tragic events happen. Yes, we organize candlelight vigils, and we offer our sincere, heartfelt thoughts and prayers. But we can’t just stop there, because when it comes to matters of faith and living as God’s people, we know, as we said just last week, that talk is cheap – and to be honest, prayers are cheap too, if that’s all we do when we can, and should, do more. We know that we’re called in this life to promote God’s way, and God’s way is most definitely not the way of violence – that as Jesus said, those who live by the sword will die by the sword.

We know as a key tenet of our faith that while laws will help, no law will ever solve all of this problem, which is deeply rooted in the human condition, and in our human brokenness. That brokenness leads us to hate one another. To envy what someone else has that we don’t. To want vengeance whenever we’re wronged. At the center of this brokenness is fear. Fear that someone will hurt us. Fear of uncertainty. Fear that others won’t respect our human dignity and worth. Fear for our security. Fear of death, and what awaits us beyond.

Friends, as followers of Christ, we’re called to not give into this fear, to not be part of this culture of violence and death. We’re called to opt out of all that because we worship a God who casts out all fear. We worship a God who offers us the peace that surpasses all understanding, the real, lasting peace that doesn’t come from the end of a gun. Our rock and our salvation is God, not a roomful of people with concealed-carry permits. Our security is Christ beside us, before us, and behind us; not body armor and an AR-15 with a bump stock.

It is absolutely, factually undeniable that our country’s unhealthy obsession with guns has been counterproductive – it hasn’t made us more secure, more safe, it’s made us less so. As Christians, God has called us to love one another, and to care for one another, and to do whatever we can to keep people from harm. In living out that call, all of us – from the most liberal Democrat to the most conservative Republican; from the avid hunter and sportsman and recreational target shooter – and I’m one of them myself; I’ve enjoyed recreational shooting at various times in my life – to the most anti-gun, never-touched-a-gun, never-want-to-touch-a-gun urban cliff-dweller – *all* of us – can agree that the supposed security that comes from the proliferation of guns has shown itself to be a lie. It’s a false security that produces only human carnage and destruction for many, and profit for a few. All of us can all agree that there are reasonable, common sense regulations that would respect our Second Amendment rights, while still preventing many of these senseless acts of evil. As a matter of faith, we all need to stand up against the current situation, against the big-money lobbyists and dealers of death, and simply say “Enough Is Enough!” – which, if I hadn’t already used it, would have been a good title for this sermon.

Thanks be to God.

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